Conference of Presidents Applauds Opening of U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem

New York, NY…  The Conference of Presidents today hailed the opening of the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem as a historic event that righted an historic injustice, without preempting any future negotiations for peace.

Stephen M. Greenberg, Chairman, and Malcolm Hoenlein, Executive Vice Chairman/CEO, of the Conference of Presidents, said in a statement:

“For 3000 years, since King David, Jews have declared Jerusalem the capital of the Jewish nation. Throughout the millennia, Jews have prayed multiple times each day for the rebuilding of Jerusalem and the return to the sacred city.  In 1995, Congress overwhelmingly endorsed the recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and called for our embassy to be relocated there. The Conference of Presidents was instrumental in supporting and advancing this legislation and the unprecedented event in the Rotunda that marked its passage.  

“We are grateful that it is finally being implemented, and that we are privileged to see the day when the American flag is flying over a new U.S. Embassy in the eternal capital of Israel, Jerusalem. We congratulate the forthright efforts of President Donald Trump, U.S. Ambassador to Israel David Friedman, the U.S. Congress, and all those involved.  We also look forward to the ceremonies marking the relocation of other embassies to Jerusalem in the coming days. We will continue to pray for the peace of Jerusalem and to celebrate the freedom of religion for all.”   

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The Conference of Presidents is the central coordinating body representing 50 national Jewish organizations on issues of national and international concern

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